NURS FPX 4050 Assessment 4 Final Care Coordination Plan EN

NHS FPX 6011 Assessment 1 Diabetes Patient Concept Map EN

Patient needs analysis

NHS FPX 6011 Assessment 1 Diabetes Patient Concept Map EN

Carole is a 35-year-old of Native American and European ancestry and is a single parent. She is ten weeks postnatal and was identified with prediabetes when she was eight months pregnant. Her blood glucose readings are between 150 and 200 after eating, so she is worried about it. She adjusted her fitness and diet habits during her pregnancy, eliminating caffeine and sugary drinks, and eating three little meals at the office instead of one large meal at home. She also incorporated frequent walks into her daily regimen. She looked into insulin use during pregnancy, but after speaking with her elderly, she concluded that insulin was not culturally appropriate for her (Scarton et al., 2021). She has a family who helps her look after the child till she returns to work. She gets very little sleep and is on her own with a 10-week-old baby, which has increased her worry (Seaton et al., 2019). Her compensation is determined by her freelance work, and she will not be rewarded if she fails to deliver. She visited the uptown health center the day prior for treatment with her gestational diabetes. 

Value And Relevance of The Evidence

NHS FPX 6011 Assessment 1 Diabetes Patient Concept Map EN

Carole had sought help with her postpartum high blood sugar. She stated that discussions with family leaders had impacted some of her professional decisions. Her doctor suggested she start taking insulin. Despite this, she declined the treatment owing to cultural and religious beliefs prohibiting the use of medications containing animal products. When caring for Carole, we should remember her history and the fact that she may involve her whole family and circle of friends in her health care decisions (Alian et al., 2018). Carole is anxious about the safety of herself and her future children. As her family is so precious to her, she wants the tribe elders to be involved in her baby’s education.

Carole’s knowledge of diabetes processes is based on her knowledge of the hazards and consequences of high blood sugar levels. Carole’s dependence on and loyalty to the leadership of the native American lineage suggests that she is completely conscious of her family’s higher risk for diabetes. She may not realize that hyperglycemia increases her risk of developing DM-II later in life. This would be crucial in educating her forefathers so that they may make informed decisions rather than just follow tradition. 

It’s critical to address how stress can affect blood sugar levels in addition to managing her various needs and gaps in knowledge. Occupational worry and insomnia, according to Carole, were all stressful for her body. Being a new mother can lead to social isolation, exhaustion, and depression. Sleep disturbances are prevalent among diabetics, and it can lead to psychological problems (Huang et al., 2019; Seaton et al., 2019). An increase in sugar levels is linked to anxiety. To achieve better glycemic control, patients must be taught how to manage their worries (Elm et al., 2019).  Carole’s freelance work is difficult since, as she earlier mentioned, she is never paid if she does not perform adequately.  Enlisting her in a monetary aid program might help alleviate several of her economic pressure.  Allowing her to receive daycare vouchers can alleviate some of her concerns.  The fact that she’s just a new mother with little income and no sleep exacerbates her worry (Seaton et al., 2019). 

Proposed Criteria for Patient Outcome Evaluation

Women with a predisposition to diabetes should be examined regularly since they are more likely to develop diabetes (King, 2017). Carole’s unmanaged hyperglycemia would be managed by measuring her blood sugar many times throughout the day, before every meal, and at night She was already checking her blood glucose levels while expecting, and she still retains her glucometer and understands how and when to use it properly. Her objective sugar levels have to be less than 140, given the reality that her typical glucose levels are 60-100.  She’d also keep track of daily blood sugar levels, detailing the times they were taken. 

NHS FPX 6011 Assessment 1 Diabetes Patient Concept Map EN

Blood glucose monitoring and patient education are critical elements of efficient diabetes management; if done correctly, the patient may benefit the most from the healthcare staff (Mathew and Tadi 2021). If she has to check her sugar levels multiple times a day, she could have trouble finding a private area to do so if she has to walk inside her office. Because of the expense of testing strips and vials, allowing her to test many times per day might result in additional costs. Putting her in touch with a distribution company might help her save costs on her orders.

Following the suggested measures and achieving more strictly regulated blood glucose levels will solve her lack of understanding of diabetes care. We’d also provide nutritional and workout recommendations to assist her to maintain glucose control while under our watchful eye. Because she noted that she usually walks at the office, giving her simple meals and assisting her in building a jogging routine will help her get considerably more diligent.

To keep count of her meals and activity, she could be given a nutrition and exercise notebook or even a mobile application.  These logs will allow her to effectively communicate all of her accomplishments with the health care professional, allowing her to suggest improvements and receive positive feedback. A resting period journal will record when she goes to bed, if she wakes up several times a night, as well as how late she rests. She would also say whether she got a restful night’s sleep. Developing a nighttime routine to help her stay away from the alcohol for the night. She might well be reading literature on how to go asleep while listening to soothing noises. Her routine may be altered as required. We’ll look into her data in the next sessions to ensure the activities are assisting her control her diabetes, lowering her tension, and accomplishing her additional goals.  

Patient And Family Communication Plan

Carole will indeed contact anybody to ensure that she fully comprehends the discussion method and strategy to ensure that she fully comprehends the risks of her illness. Her lineage and culture are important to her; thus, they must be considered as part of her therapy plan. Carole’s sessions must contain free discussion and queries designed to evaluate her comprehension.  Carole’s commitment to the food and exercise regimen and monitoring her performance will be crucial to the strategy’s long-term success. Carole’s parents’ involvement in the program will aid in her compliance and ease in changing her lifestyle to enhance her diabetes management (Scarton et al., 2021). A female’s risk of developing weight control, nutrition, dietary changes, and fitness must all be addressed throughout the postpartum period.

Conclusion

In the end, adhering to the story, allowing Carole and her family to join meetings to check progress, and reviewing Carole’s development with her may be enough to achieve results. She will be able to achieve her objective of controlling her postnatal diabetes through constructive support and development advice, and she and the baby will be on route to a favorable lifestyle adjustment that will preserve their safe welfare and health.

References

Alian, S., Li, J., & Pandey, V. (2018). A personalized recommendation system to support diabetes self-management for American Indians. IEEE Access, 6, 73041-73051. https://doi.org/10.1109/ACCESS.2018.2882138

Elm, J. H., Walls, M. L., & Aronson, B. D. (2019). Sources of stress among Midwest American Indian adults with type 2 diabetes. American Indian and Alaska native mental health research (Online), 26(1), 33. doi: 10.5820/aian.2601.2019.33

Huang, Y. C., Zuniga, J. A., & García, A. A. (2019). Association between sleep and serious psychological distress in patients with diabetes. Psychology, Health & Medicine24(8), 925–935. https://doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2019.1612075

NHS FPX 6011 Assessment 1 Diabetes Patient Concept Map EN

Mathew, T. K., & Tadi, P. (2021). Blood glucose monitoring. In StatPearls [Internet]. StatPearls Publishing. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK555976/

Scarton, L., Hebert, L. E., Goins, R. T., Umans, J. G., Jiang, L., Comiford, A., & Manson, S. M. (2021). Diabetes and health-related quality of life among American Indians: the role of psychosocial factors. Quality of Life Research, 30(9), 2497-2507. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-021-02830-4

Seaton, V. A., Narcisse, M. R., Subica, A. M., Long, C. R., Matthews, E. E., & McElfish, P. A. (2019). Sleep quality partially mediates the association between type 2 diabetes and psychological distress in Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander adults in the United States: Analysis of the 2014 National Health Interview Survey. Asian American Journal of Psychology, 10(3), 258.  https://doi.org/10.1037/aap0000147   

 

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